Changing the shape of a virtual machine DB System in OCI with Terraform

True public cloud means the elasticity of the cloud resources. The newest feature related to OCI DBSystem enhanced a few days back means exactly this, true database resource elasticity. I can imagine that in many cases your current DBSystem shape is too small or too large for the workload which is executed. In that case, it would be great to have some simple way to change CPU power by alternative VM shapes. That is why recently I was extremely excited about the dynamic option for DBSystem in case of virtual machine shape change.  You know that for sure, I am a huge fan of automation, Infrastructure as Code approach and Terraform runtime. So I have checked immediately if we can find the corresponding change in the Terraform OCI Provider code. Guess what? Version 3.65.0 supports this new OCI feature. Below a short video shows how it was easy to use this new feature in brand new Terraform OCI Provider.

Bon Appetit,

Martin, The Cook.

Private Endpoints for OCI Autonomous Database

It is not the first blog post about ATP, but I think this one is even more interesting. For your information, a few days back at OCI Release Notes webpage I have found information about new features for OCI Autonomous DB offering. I am talking about Private Endpoints for ATP or ADW databases. This feature has been awaited for a very long time. Previously your ATP or ADW databases were available only via public IPs. Now you can nest them inside a particular VCN and subnet. It means your database will be available under private IP enclosed in your subnet’s CIDR. Of course, you need to prepare some Network Security Groups (NSG) on ATP/ADW level and VM level. Since that moment VM can connect to ATP/ADW with SQLNet connection via private IP. For testing purposes I have created small GitHub repo and below you can find a video about how to use that repo. I believe you will find this dish very delicious. 🙂

Bon Appetit,

Martin, The Cook.

 

 

 

OCI Cloud Shell

oci_cloud_shell_buttonThis button on the top right corner I have noticed some time ago in my internal tenancies. At that time this feature was in a Limited Availability (LA) period, but today it has been published in General Availability (GA). More details about it you can read here. What are we talking about? About OCI Cloud Shell! 🙂 I am sure it will be a powerful feature for many of you. There is no need to set up VM  to run OCI CLI commands and many more such as git, java, python, SQLPlus, kubectl, helm, maven, grade, terraform. How to access OCI Cloud Shell? You have to just click on this button and then at the bottom of your OCI Console in just a few seconds in the black popup window fully operational shell-based environment will be visible. Immediately your commands can be executed there. And of course, you are pre-authenticated to your tenancy. Nothing more to configure, just work with the cloud resources. Below you can find a quick video about how to use it for VCN creation and then deletion. Then quick ride with terraform plan and apply for the first lesson from my Terraform+OCI tutorial. Nothing big in a sense of recording, just a bit of new taste 🙂

Bon Appetit,

Martin, The Cook.

 

How to use Terraform and OCI – lesson 9

I hope you have noticed that huge news at OCI Release Notes. In February 2020 OCI global footprint has grown significantly with three new regions (Amsterdam in the Netherlands, Jeddah in Saudi Arabia and Melbourne in Australia). I am located in Europe so immediately I have requested the subscription of Amsterdam DC. So now in my tenancy, I have Frankfurt and Amsterdam regions ready to be utilized. Given this fact, it was obvious for me, I can try to set up some extension to my previous lesson, lesson 8. I could convert local VCN peering in the same region into a remote VCN peering configuration. In this new setup, my BackendServer, with all necessary cloud infrastructure, would be deployed in Amsterdam. And I have done it. So now we have brand new lesson 9 for which code is available here. There is also video, ready for you, ready to be watched! 🙂 As always I am asking kindly for subscribing to our YouTube channel. Believe me, I am planning to record more and more stuff and publish it here in a form of blog post and video blog on YT 🙂

Bon Appetit,

Martin, The Cook.

OCI File Storage Service + Network Security Groups (NSG) with Terraform

What is the topic for today? Network security of your OCI cloud infrastructure! Honestly speaking always an important topic, right? The basics of Network Security Groups (NSG), for the first time I have described in this blog post. Recently I have found in OCI Release Notes, that OCI File Storage Services supports now NSG. Immediately I have checked Terraform OCI Provider, just to confirm my favorite automation runtime also supports it. And guess what? Terraform OCI Provider in version 3.55.0 fully covers this feature. That is really amazing! Just one week later, after OCI release, Terraform Provider codebase has been updated! That is why I have decided to test it and add this stuff to my Terraform+OCI tutorial as a lesson 5a. I hope you will find it interesting! If it is true I really encourage you to subscribe to our YouTube Channel 🙂 One more thing – File Storage Service UDP and TCP ports for NSGs and Security Lists have been documented here.

Bon Appetit,

Martin, The Cook.

NewStuff series – dynamic VM shape resize in OCI with Terraform

I am trying to follow constantly updated release notes of OCI. Nearly every single day we have something new there, so sometimes it really hard to follow all of the news there. To read some theory is great, but test it is even greater… and harder, to be honest. So I was thinking it would be great to have a chance to watch this kind of testing on YouTube, especially with Terraform OCI Provider usage. To be sure Provider has been updated and it follows OCI’s Rest API changes. And you know what? I haven’t found such videos on YT! So…? So I have decided to record my own one. Pretty short in form. Just 3-5 minutes long. And here is the first one. It is about a new compute instance feature – dynamic VM shape resize. No more compute instance migration, no more compute instance re-provisioning. Just a couple of minutes to restart. And that is all! This elasticity is great!

Bon Appetit,

Martin, The Cook.